How To… Cook a Turkey

18 11 2010



~ ~ ~ ~ ~HAPPY   THANKSGIVING~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Cooking for Thanksgiving is one of the most important times of the year! Families are united, games are played, and stories are shared. Now although this sounds like a great time and all, what people really are coming to dinner for is good turkey! Fortunately, speaking for myself that is, I have experienced a variety of tasty turkeys. My uncle prepares the turkey the same way each year, and has been doing this since I was a little girl. Now I’m sure you have your own ways of cooking your turkey and like to stick to them, but I can guarantee you that if you follow my uncle’s instructions below, your turkey will come out perfect every time …

 

*****STEPS TO COOKING THE PERFECT TURKEY*****

1. PREHEAT YOUR OVEN TO 475 DEGREES. NO THIS IS NOT A TYPO AND WILL EXPLAIN IN A BIT

2. NEXT, MELT SOME BUTTER, A SOFT WHIP OF YOUR CHOICE. BE SURE THAT THERE IS ENOUGH TO COAT THE TUREY AT LEAST TWICE. NOTE! THIS BUTTER IS NOT GOING ON THE OUTSIDE…

3. THE NEXT PART IS NOT SO APPEALING TO MOST FOLK, BUT IS ESSENTIAL IN COOKING YOUR TURKEY. YOU’LL WANT TO SEPARATE THE SKIN OF YOUR TURKEY FROM THE BREAST MEET. YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO FIT YOUR HAND IN, AT THE MOST, HALF WAY.YOU MAY WANT TO USE RUBBER GLOVES FOR THIS. (NO BUTTER ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE SKIN)!!!!!

4. THE NEXT PART IS OPTIONAL*** IF YOU WOULD LIKE, ADD SOME ROSEMARY AND THYME WHERE YOU JUST MADE A POCKET BETWEEN THE SKIN AND THE BREAST MEAT OF THE TURKEY.

**NOTE**

ROSEMARY:

The fresh and dried leaves are used frequently in traditional Mediterranean cuisine; they have a bitter, astringent taste and are highly aromatic, which complements a wide variety of foods. A tisane can also be made from them. When burned they give off a distinct mustard smell, as well as a smell similar to that of burning which can be used to flavor foods while barbecuing.

Rosemary is extremely high in iron, calcium, and vitamin B6.

Rosemary extract has been shown to improve the shelf life and heat stability of omega-3 rich oils, which are prone to going rancid.

THYME:

Thyme is often used to flavour meats, soups and stews. It has a particular affinity to and is often used as a primary flavour with lamb, tomatoes and eggs.

Thyme, while flavourful, does not overpower and blends well with other herbs and spices.

Thyme is sold both fresh and dried. The fresh form is more flavourful but also less convenient; storage life is rarely more than a week. While summer-seasonal, fresh thyme is often available year-round.

5. SALT AND PEPPEER THE OUTSIDE THIS HELPS MAKE THIS SKIN NICE AND CRISPY.

6. I SUGGEST COOKING YOUR STUFFING SEPARATELY !!! IT IS DIFFICULT FOR MOST TO COOK STUFFING INSIDE THE TURKEY BECAUSE TEMPERATURE VARIES BETWEEN THE STUFFING AND THE TURKEY ITSELF. IT IS ALSO RECOGNIZED AS A HEALTH HAZARD.SO COOK YOUR STUFFING IN A SEPARATE CASSEROLE DISH…BE SAFE.

7. PLACE THE TURKEY IN A COVERED ROAST PAN AND PLACE IT IN THE 475 DEGREE OVEN FOR 20 MINUTES. NO WATER IS NECESSARY BECAUSE LOCKING IN THE TURKEY’S JUICES KEEPS IT MOIST.

8. NOW REDUCE THE TEMPERATURE TO 250 DEGREES, ONCE AGAIN, NOT  TYPO. THE PROCESS OF COOKING THE TURKEY IS SLOW. OFTE TIMES A TURKEY IS DRY INSIDE AND OUT IS BECAUSE IT WAS OVERCOOKED.

9. COOK THE TURKEY AT 250 DEGREES FOR 20 MINUTES FOR EACH ADDITIONAL POUND. NO BASTING IS NECESSARY.

10. WHEN THE TURKEY IS DONE, ALLOW IT TO REST FOR 20 MINUTES SO THE JUICES WITHIN THE TURKEY CAN REDISTRIBUTE THEMSELVES THROUGHOUT. THIS MAKES CARVING EASIER BECAUSE THE TURKEY IS MOIST.

……..SUGGESTIONS……..

I recommend using an electronic meat thermometer you would insert in the breast or thigh after the oven has cooled to 250°. Check it regularly after half way through the cooking time just to make sure the turkey doesn’t get done sooner than expected and, conversely, to make sure the bird is fully cooked.

8 to 12 lbs.
2 to 3 Days
13 to 16 lbs.
3 to 4 Days
17 to 20 lbs.
4 to 5 Days
21 to 24 lbs.
5 to 6 Days

TURKEY DISASTERS

RECENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

COOKING TIMES

 

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One response

18 11 2010
Rick Hancock

Great job with your last several posts. Excellent!

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